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How to Build a Strong Support Team

A Healthcare House: How to Build a Strong Support Team By Rachel Basso, Guest Blogger

I am going to share some tips on how to build a well-rounded support team that I have learned from my personal journey with Endometriosis and the resulting chronic pain. Your support team is there to make sure you don’t have to walk your health journey alone. I certainly wouldn’t have made it this far without the people and resources who were there to help me, and I advocate now so that no one else will have to!

When beginning to build your support team, first identify your key needs and then seek out the right person or resource to help solve that problem. I like to think of this process as building a house.

Let’s Build a House

Why a house? Well, you are …

 

Tips for Finding Providers Who Can Help You

Tips for Finding Providers Who Can Help You by Barby Ingle

Finding a highly qualified, competent, and compassionate physician to manage your specific illness or condition takes a lot of hard work and energy, but it is an investment that is well worth the effort. I have met over 90 healthcare providers, including hospital staff, neurologists, cardiologists, psychologists, X-ray technicians, pain management, general practice, orthopedic and the list goes on.  It is important to keep in mind that you are not looking for just any general physician but rather a physician who has expertise in the treatment and management of your specific illness or condition. Find out if the doctor knows about CHRONIC PAIN in-depth. Sometimes a pain doctor will know more about arthritis then neuropathy pain because of the types of classes taken in medical school and previous patients. …

 

Taylor Duane Interviews iPain President Barby Ingle for Thesis Paper

These answers were completed by Barby Ingle specifically for Taylor Duane’s senior thesis.

I’m investigating the question, “Should opiates used to treat cancer pain be rescheduled for cancer patients who are suffering from chronic pain?” What is your position on this and why?

International Pain Foundation (iPain) believes that all options should be on the table when it comes to treatment. That it should be between a provider and patient as to the goals of treatment and for some opiates will be right, for others it wont. But nothing should be taken off the table because we are all created differently and taking options away from patients because it doesn’t work for someone else is not access to proper and timely care for all.

 

What is your experience that informs that opinion?

I have been a chronic pain patient for …

 

10 ACTIONS TO MAKE LIFE MORE POSITIVE AND UPLIFTING FOR YOURSELF

by Barby Ingle

  1. Choose happiness.
  2. Create goals and more towards accomplishing them.
  3. Get involved in projects that you can be interested in and successfully complete.
  4. Keep yourself surrounded with happy people.
  5. Look at the bright side of challenges.
  6. Motivate yourself.
  7. Practice meditation and controlling your thoughts.
  8. Smile big and often.
  9. Visualize success.
  10. When anxiety and stresses are high, turn it over to God.

More about Barby can be found on her website

 

TIPS FOR CAREGIVERS WHEN IT COMES TO ASSESSING HOW THE PATIENT IS DOING

TIPS FOR CAREGIVERS WHEN IT COMES TO ASSESSING HOW THE PATIENT IS DOING – by Barby Ingle

  • Are they able to communicate?
  • Are they able to stay focused and remember things?
  • Are they frequently grimacing, crying, groaning, or otherwise indicating extreme distress?
  • Are they maintaining proper grooming practices?
  • Are they sleeping at night for the right number of hours?
  • Can they speak clearly and audibly and does what they say make sense?
  • Do they appear anxious or irritable?
  • Do they appear depressed?
  • Has their appetite increased or decreased, or have they gained or lost weight?
  • Have they increased use of tobacco or alcohol?
  • Have they maintained their relationships with family and friends?
  • Insomnia and poor sleeping cycles can result from being in a lot of pain.
 

New Year, New Goals

RESOLUTION: DEAL WITH YOUR CHRONIC PAIN THIS NEW YEAR
by Barby Ingle

If you’ve been living with chronic pain, New Year’s is the perfect time to make a few simple changes to increase positive daily living. Below Barby Ingle, explores tips for 2017 resolutions when you are the one in three Americans living in pain.

  1. Walk at least several times weekly. – Regular, low impact aerobic exercise reduces inflammation, strengthens your muscles and provides expedited healing by sending oxygen-rich blood through out your body. Depending on your individual level of fitness, you may want to start out walking only a few minutes at a time, and gradually—over a period of several weeks and maybe even months— try to walk for at least 30 minutes at least 3 or 4 times.
  2. Get at least eight hours of sleep each 24 hour
 

My Life Is Not My Own

My Life Is Not My Own
By: Michell Freeman

 

My name is Michell Freeman, I am from a small town in Bennettsville, South Carolina and this is my story. On November 4, 2013 I was in an automobile accident that involved a fatality. I was hit by a car that had ran a red light. I was unable to walk without great pain. When I arrived at the hospital my legs felt very cold and I had lost feeling in my saddle area and later down my left leg. The Doctor came in and told my family that I had a disc fragment that sequestered. The doctor told my husband that I was to lie flat on my back only to get up to use the restroom and if I lost control of my bowel or bladder to call …

 

Study for severe to very severe COPD patients

New Study for People with Severe to Very Severe COPD

This research study is testing whether a new investigational drug that targets eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) could help patients with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) control symptoms and reduce exacerbations (flare-ups) that lead to hospitalizations. The new investigational drug will be compared to oral and inhaled corticosteroids, the current standard of care for COPD.

More about the study:

  • The study drug (Benralizumab) is administered by Subcutaneous (under the skin) injection (SC).
  • There will be 3794 participants in this trial

If you are interested, please find the full study details and eligibility criteria listed here.

Eligibility Criteria:

Participants must:

  • be between 40 – 85 years old
  • have been diagnosed by a medical professional as having severe to very severe COPD
  • be a current smoker or former smoker
 

Share Your Story; Jan Marie Moore

After 15 years of suffering (docs cut a nerve in my c-spine during neck surgery), I have been diagnosed with CRPS. My spine is on fire 247. My body has atrophied terribly. I can barely walk or use my arms. Doc put me on Nucynta and a muscle relaxer. Its only helping a little. I’m 65 now, and frightened of the future. My head goes to dark places in the night. I saw 10 different doctors before this. All of whom called me “drug seeking” out of ignorance. The psychological damage they did to me is permanent, but for the sake of my family, I must press forward and try everything I can. I hope for all of our sake the medical community gets more savvy very soon! by JanMarieMoore…

 

The Pain Experience: Meeting the Needs of Pain Patients by Stephanie Lynn Christianson

The Pain Experience: Meeting the Needs of Pain Patients
by Stephanie Lynn Christianson

Executive Summary
Pain is difficult to define with certainty. Healthcare professionals are confronted with a high degree of complexity which affect the standards of care. The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) defines pain as, “An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage.” The experience of pain encompasses many factors which are frequently addressed only in part or neglected. The patient’s experience includes extensive emotional and psychological aspects which arise from sensory trauma in the body. The needs of a pain patient require more than treating the physiological symptoms. In order to fully address the comprehensive needs of the patient, emotional and psychological factors must be considered. To improve the quality of life of those living in pain, all contributory …

 
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