Pediatric Asthma Study Info

Recruitment for Pediatric Asthma Clinical Study
Asthma is a common lung condition among children. Your child may already have the symptoms of asthma like coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath. Current asthma treatments don’t work well for every child. Clinical researchers are studying research treatments that may better control asthma in children. 

Pediatric Asthma Studies.

Local no-cost research studies enrolling kids ages 12–17 for #asthma.

 

Study for severe to very severe COPD patients

New Study for People with Severe to Very Severe COPD

This research study is testing whether a new investigational drug that targets eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) could help patients with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) control symptoms and reduce exacerbations (flare-ups) that lead to hospitalizations. The new investigational drug will be compared to oral and inhaled corticosteroids, the current standard of care for COPD.

More about the study:

  • The study drug (Benralizumab) is administered by Subcutaneous (under the skin) injection (SC).
  • There will be 3794 participants in this trial

If you are interested, please find the full study details and eligibility criteria listed here.

Eligibility Criteria:

Participants must:

  • be between 40 – 85 years old
  • have been diagnosed by a medical professional as having severe to very severe COPD
  • be a current smoker or former smoker
 

Share Your Story: Marge Sudbay

My daughter has had this horrific disease for approximately 20 yrs. She suffered for years as her work comp doctors refused to consider RSD. Consequently, no early treatment!  She has severe pain from noises. Her “pain Dr.” told her to wear ear plugs!.This idiot hasn’t read Oaklander’s study showing damaged nerve endings. He also states Ketamine has been studied and doesn’t work. My daughter had this med IV for a few days several years ago with 2 wonderful weeks of relief. The truth is it was expensive & work comp doesn’t want to pay. My positive thoghts & prayers to each. Marge Sudbay…

 

Share Your Story; Jan Marie Moore

After 15 years of suffering (docs cut a nerve in my c-spine during neck surgery), I have been diagnosed with CRPS. My spine is on fire 247. My body has atrophied terribly. I can barely walk or use my arms. Doc put me on Nucynta and a muscle relaxer. Its only helping a little. I’m 65 now, and frightened of the future. My head goes to dark places in the night. I saw 10 different doctors before this. All of whom called me “drug seeking” out of ignorance. The psychological damage they did to me is permanent, but for the sake of my family, I must press forward and try everything I can. I hope for all of our sake the medical community gets more savvy very soon! by JanMarieMoore…

 

Share Your Story: Ann Lavendar

I was diagnosed with RSD in January of 2002.  Since that time I’ve had more than 40 procedures, ranging from stellate blocks (both through my throat and the more dangerous procedure through my back and around my lungs), RFTC’s (radio frequency thermocoagulation blocks), exploratory surgery resulting in a vein wrap around a trapped nerve which seemed to be the culprit (complication following wrist surgery) and finally three tries at a dorsal column nerve stimulator (two fails and one semi-success).  It spread like wildfire during an especially bad exacerbation of symptoms, from my left hand/wrist, throughout the arm, my right arm,  across parts of my back and side, into my right hip and leg and across parts of my face.  The pain was so terrible that when I did fall asleep, I woke up clawing at my face and arms from …

 

Medicare #StepTherapy Rules

Step Therapy

Step therapy is a type of prior authorization. With step therapy, in most cases, you must first try certain less expensive drugs that have been proven effective for most people with your condition before you can move up a “step” to a more expensive drug. For instance, your plan may require you to first try a generic prescription drug (if available), then a less expensive brand-name prescription drug on its drug list, before it will cover a similar, more expensive brand-name prescription drug. However, if you’ve already tried the similar, less expensive drugs and they didn’t work, or if your prescriber believes that your medical condition makes it medically necessary for you to be on the more expensive step-therapy prescription drug, he or she can contact your plan to ask for an exception. If your prescriber’s request is

 

Respond to CDC proposed guidelines

Here is your chance to voice your opinion on how the PROPOSED CDC Guidelines may affect you as a pain patient who needs proper and timely access to care. (this link is the place to submit your comments), there is also a link on the CDC page that brings you to the guidelines, as well it might be a good idea to write your statement in a word document so that you dont lose it, as well as share it here on our page in the comment section on this post. ‪#‎ShareYourStory‬‪#‎RaiseYourVoice‬ ‪#‎MakeADifference‬

Dont forget to send your letter to the CDC… http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=CDC-2015-0112-0001 #AccessToProperCare #MakeADifference #ShareYourStory

 

Here is POP President Barby Ingle’s submission:
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
4770 Buford Highway N.E., Mailstop F-63,
Atlanta, GA, 30341…

 

What is Central Pain Syndrome?

“What is Central Pain Syndrome?”
Central Pain Syndrome is a lifelong neurological disease of the Central Nervous System, which causes constant, unending, agonizing pain signals of all somatic types simultaneously. It is caused by lesions on the somatic pathways in the brain, brainstem, and/or spinal cord, which can be the result of disease or injury. There is presently no cure, and any treatments are few and of limited efficacy.

The current definition of Central Pain Syndrome given in the Introduction to the textbook “Central Pain Syndrome: Pathophysiology, diagnosis and management,” by Canavero and Bonicalzi (2 nd Edition, 2013) is: Spontaneous and/or evoked, anomalous, painful or non-painful, sensations projected in a body area congruent with a clearly imaged lesion impairing – transitorily or permanently – the function of the spinothalamoparietal thermoalgesic pathway.

Central Pain Syndrome as defined above has an estimated …

 

Share Your Story: Emily Ullrich

In hindsight, my chronic pain began at around eleven years old, when I started menstruating. My periods were so extremely painful that I would literally pass out from the pain. My mother had painful periods, and so my agony was chalked up to genes, and as I got older, I learned a few tricks to help the pain. As a teenager, I had regular pelvic pain and urinary tract infections, and by the time I was in college, I started seeking answers for my pain. I met endless doctors who shrugged me off with comments like, “You’re too young to have serious pain, I think you should just take Ibuprofen and use a heating pad,” and “It’s normal for women to have pain during their periods.” I continued to seek help over the next two decades, and finally, in my …

 

The Pain Experience: Meeting the Needs of Pain Patients by Stephanie Lynn Christianson

The Pain Experience: Meeting the Needs of Pain Patients
by Stephanie Lynn Christianson

Executive Summary
Pain is difficult to define with certainty. Healthcare professionals are confronted with a high degree of complexity which affect the standards of care. The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) defines pain as, “An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage.” The experience of pain encompasses many factors which are frequently addressed only in part or neglected. The patient’s experience includes extensive emotional and psychological aspects which arise from sensory trauma in the body. The needs of a pain patient require more than treating the physiological symptoms. In order to fully address the comprehensive needs of the patient, emotional and psychological factors must be considered. To improve the quality of life of those living in pain, all contributory …

 
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